Product FAQ - BurnPro

Introduction

Q 01: Why did I fail to extract and encode MP3 from Audio CD?

Q 02: Can all CD-ROM drives convert CD to WAV, MP3, or WMA?

Q 03: Why do the ripped MP3 files play at wrong speed and/or shows wrong length?

Q 04: Why do I have to register with the CDDB in order to retrieve track information for CD conversions?

Q 05: What's the difference between CDDB and CD-Text?


Q 01: Why did I fail to extract and encode MP3 from Audio CD?

A: 1. Your CD-ROM doesn't support audio data extraction. In this case, BurnPro can't work at present. You can try other applications which support analog access method if you can play your CD with the sound card. The default CD-ROM type was set incorrect and doesn't accord with your CD-ROM.

   2. Some sectors of your CD were damaged. In order to keep perfect quality copies of the original music, BurnPro will stop extracting when meet error sectors and tried several times. You can clean your CD and try again.

Top of Page

Q 02: Can all CD-ROM drives convert CD to WAV, MP3, or WMA?

A: Although most current CD-ROM drives can convert digitally, only CD-ROM drives that support the Redbook audio format and have a reasonable level of seeking accuracy can convert tracks from CDs to disk in digital format. Many older CD-ROM drives and some new ones, do not support this capability.

Top of Page

Q 03: Why do the ripped MP3 files play at wrong speed and/or shows wrong length?

A: This is nothing wrong with the MP3 files extracted from music CD with BurnPro. Some MP3 players (hardware or software) have problem playback 48000Hz audios which is the default sample rate on DVD. And some players can't deal with the Variable Bitrate (VBR) MP3 format.

Top of Page

Q 04: Why do I have to register with the CDDB in order to retrieve track information for CD conversions?

A: Although most current CD-ROM drives can convert digitally, only CD-ROM drives that support the Redbook audio format and have a reasonable level of seeking accuracy can convert tracks from CDs to disk in digital format. Many older CD-ROM drives and some new ones, do not support this capability.

Top of Page

Q 05: What's the difference between CDDB and CD-Text?

A: CDDB, short for Compact Disc Database, is a licensed trademark of Gracenote, Inc. It is a database for software applications to look up audio CD (compact disc) information over the Internet. This is performed by a client who calculates a (nearly) unique disc ID and then queries the database. As a result, the client is able to display the artist name, CD title, track list and some additional information.

   The database is used primarily by media players and CD ripper software. If a CD is not recognized by a media player or CD ripper it can be added to the database if you fill in the names and artists etc. in a media player.

   CD-Text is an extension of the Red Book Compact Disc specifications standard for audio CDs. It allows for storage of additional information (e.g. album name, song name, and artist) on a standards-compliant audio CD. The information is stored either in the lead-in area of the CD, where there is roughly five kilobytes of space available or in the Subchannels R to W on the disc, which can store about 31 megabytes. The latter areas are not used by strict Red Book CDs. The text is stored in a format usable by the Interactive Text Transmission System (ITTS). Utilities exist to automatically rip CD-Text data, and insert it into CDDB or freedb.

   CD Text information can be encoded on a CD during mastering or replication. Most mastering facilities will encode CD Text free of charge, while CD replicators may charge extra for this service. CD Text information will include CD title, track titles and artist's name. However, be advised that only compatible players can display CD Text. These may include car systems, home Hi-Fi systems, some DVD players, portable CD players, etc. Not all CD/DVD players are CD Text compatible.

Top of Page

Logo